Farmers are left with few options for input costs next growing season

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Farmers are left with few options for input costs next growing season

U.S. farmers are facing difficult management decisions for next year’s growing season. 

Nebraska grower Mitch Oswald tells Brownfield he will plant less corn acres next year because input costs are expected to double. “I’m going more of a 50/50 split for corn and soybeans just to try to spread the risk over two crops instead of just sticking with corn.”

Mike Bergen, who farms in South Central Nebraska, says he’s already booked his chemicals because some might not be available. “We’re going to see a lot of supply issues.  We’ve got retailers pulling pricing right now because they’re not sure they’re going to be able to get the supply or not.”

But, some farmers are making other decisions.

Quentin Connealy grows corn and soybeans along the Missouri River. “We just started booking some last week, we’re probably a little late to the boat, but luckily we had some left over from last year so saving a little bit on 32 percent there.”

All three spoke with Brownfield during cab conversations last week.