Western Corn Belt farmers say stalk quality is a priority this harvest season

News

Western Corn Belt farmers say stalk quality is a priority this harvest season

For some farmers in the Western Corn Belt, stalk quality is a top concern. 

Jerry Baysinger farms near the Southeast Nebraska town of Bruning. “We’ve got some dryland corn and even dryland beans that are starting to meltdown from the last week to 10 days heat that we’ve had,” he says.

Jay Reiners grows corn and soybeans near South-Central Juniata, and says a late June hailstorm hurt his corn crop. “Bruises are really low at the bottom of the stock and the weight of the ear is starting to pull them over so as soon as they’re dry enough to go into the dryer, we’ll probably go after them.”

Southwestern grower Kerry McPheeters of Gothenburg says there are unknown issues that usually impact his crops. “We still will get some wind in the fall and that can be a problem at times if you have a hybrid that might be susceptible to wind more so than other or had underlying issues that we didn’t realize.”

Some farmers have started soybean harvest in Nebraska and corn is expected to start within the next two to three weeks.